Compost Buckets at the Bookstore!

Are you living on campus and would like to compost your food waste??
Blue line Compost Buckets are now available at the Packbasket bookstore.
Buckets are $8.50 each, discount of 25% off for Paul Smith’s College students, curtesy of the Center for Sustainability!
  1. Buy a bucket,
  2. fill it with your food waste compost,
  3. and return it to the bookstore when it’s full,
  4. grab an empty bucket, and repeat! 
In addition to the Packbasket full compost buckets can be dropped at the following locations,

Center for Sustainability Spring Programs & Events

February 

  • Feb 17th via Zoom Electric Vehicle Panel Discussion at 6pm

  • 2022 FOOD JUSTICE SUMMIT: FEEDBACK: MEETING IN THE MIDDLE, FEBRUARY 23 & FEBRUARY 24, Sponsored by the PSC Center for Sustainability. Contact sustainability@paulsmiths.edu if you’d like to attend this 2 day virtual summit. The 2022 Food Justice Summit, hosted by AHI in collaboration with Adirondack Food System Network.


 

 

 

 

March

  • March 21-25 Sustainability Grant Vote

 

April 

   Keynote Address: Robin Wall Kimmerer: The Honorable Harvest

May

  • Trade- A-Palooza April 29th through May 7th

Fall 2021 Center for Sustainability Programs

Monday, September 6th – Club Fair

Find the Smitty Sustainability Committee table while you’re checking out other club tables on the Great Lawn!

Saturday, September 11th – Blue Line Compost Tour Field Trip

10 am van pickup at the post office. Awesome tour and valuable learning experience! Visit the sign-up sheet outside Kate Glenn’s office (Student Center 101) if interested in joining. For more info, visit https://bluelinecompost.com/

September 25th – Cider Pressing! 

10 am-2 pm – Outside the Student Center. We’ll be using an old fashioned double barreled cider press to make fresh press apple cider. Hot cider will be sold in wide-mouth glass pint jars for the suggested donation of 3$ a jar. Come check out the bike powered apple masher we borrow from Ravenwood Homestead.

October 5th – Northern Power and Light speaker Emmett Smith

Paul Smith’s College is powered 100% by Local Small Scale Hydroelectricity from Northern Power and Light, CEO of Northern Power and Light, Emmett Smith will speak on campus about local hydro in the Adirondacks and how you can support local renewable energy in the North Country. Pine Room @ 6:30pm. More information: https://www.npandl.com/

October 9th – Azure Mountain Hydroelectric Tour

Tour this beautiful old hydroelectric plant in St. Regis Falls, which helps power Paul Smith’s College. Plant Operator Everette Smith will show us around this facility built in the 90’s using 100 year old equipment on a dam on the st regis river. 1 pm van pickup at the post office -Sign up at the Center for Sustainability, Student Center 101

November 2nd- Zoom Panel on Electric Vehicles

Are you thinking of purchasing an Electric Vehicle? Hear from a panel of PSC employees who’ve all made the transition to electric. Speakers include Nicholas Hunt-Bull, Dan Kelting, Scott Van-Lear, and Andrew Kelly. There is more than one way to drive electric, our panel reflects that. You’ll hear from people driving 100% electric vehicles, as well as plug in hybrid EV.  Program is held in Freer Auditorium and Zoom, 4:30 pm-5:30 pm

Meet Our Staff!

Sustainability Coordinator, Faculty, Department of Environment and Society

I am often asked what a Sustainability Coordinator does, the primary focus of my position is to help make our campus and community more resilient, by mitigating and adapting to the affects of climate change. I focus mostly on reducing the college’s greenhouse gas emissions levels, I champion and oversee renewable energy and energy efficiency projects on campus. I also coordinate our STARS (Sustainable Tracking and Rating System) strategic plan and reporting. This includes various initiatives regarding sustainable dining, waste minimization, and other initiatives related to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. I’ve been teaching for about 7 years. I teach about four classes a year, primarily upper division classes in our Sustainability BS program. check out my faculty page to learn more about myself the classes I teach. I also direct the Center for Sustainability, this semester we have a staff of about 4 student employees and Sustainability Fellows working on various campus initiatives and programs.

Looking to get involved? Have an idea? Have questions? Reach out, I’d love to hear from you. Stop by the Center for Sustainability (Student Center 101) or e-mail me at kglenn@paulsmiths.edu. Check us out on social media @pscsustainability (Instagram) Paul Smith’s College Center for Sustainability (Facebook).

Center for Sustainability Staff

Name: Sean Jackson ,

Title: Sustainability Fellow: Transportation

E-mail: sjackson@paulsmiths.edu,

Major: Sustainability BS

 

 

Name: Nicole Distasio ,

Title: Sustainability Fellow: Sustainable Dining

E-mail: ndistasio@paulsmith.edu

Major: Sustainability BS, Minor: Entrepreneurial Business

A baby, Six Chickens, and a Creative College Student

By: Serenata Wright

When given time and support, most things could be possible. Things like staying sane, learning, and saving is possible. The chickens were bought during a very hard time. The Coronavirus has destroyed a lot, but not HOPE. Hope was found in these chickens, whether it was to keep each other sane, allow learning for the baby, allowing access for me to establish a sure thing. Cultivating and raising chickens will provide happiness, eggs, and potential money saving or acquiring action. With these egg-producers, money does not need to be spent on eggs. With these animals, they will become pets and loved. With these new things, a baby will learn about animals closely. My baby sister will be raised as a self-sustaining person. I am leading the way of green development, within my whole family as well. And in this situation, me and my family will learn to be self-sufficient, remain sane, save money, and be happy.

Tips on Raising Chickens!! by Kate Glenn 

WHERE TO GET THEM: If you buy chicks online, THEY COME IN THE MAIL! Don’t worry, they are safe, mostly…. and they throw in a few extra birds just in case. You can also purchase chicks or slightly older pullets at your local tractor supply. Some people even hatch their own in a incubator (borrow from a friend or purchase online). I also like to talk to my local farmer friends and they will often gift me a few old layers- they don’t lay every day so the farmer is happy to give them away. If you are not looking for large numbers of eggs daily (couple for breakfast) than this might be a good option for you.

Check out Murray McMurray Hatchery Click Here 

WHAT KIND SHOULD YOU GET: There are many breeds of chicken- Bard Rocks, Americanas, Australorp, Rhode Island Reds are just a few of the breeds known for being good egg layers. It’s worth doing a little research. Also ask your local farmer if they have any heritage or special breeds they would be wiling to share with you. I’m a fan of Rhode Island Reds, they are good egg layers and I’ve used them for meat birds as well. Although a variety of different breeds in your flock is also fun.

CARE FOR YOUR BIRDS: Chicks need a nice box (old plastic tub w/lid with holes is great). They will need some wood shavings, water, feed bowl, and heat lamp. Your local supply store should have everything you need. Although you don’ t need fancy supplies. See what you have around the house that you can use, before buying anything. When birds get bigger (and they will) they will need to be outside. Fresh waster and food every day- also make sure you lock them in your coop at night, and let them out in the morning.

THE COOP: You can buy a coop or build a coop, but you will need something warm (insulated), dry, and secure! Your chickens need a safe try place to roost at night where they can be protected from predators. Research some chicken coop plans online, find a used one on craigslsits for facebook marketpace, also consider buying new. A coop should last you a lifetime. I purchased my coop used from Jim Tucker and it’s got these great egg boxes with a door that mean I have easy access to eggs without disturbing the chickens. Clean out your coop- the poop is great fertilizer for your garden(it’s like gold).

FEED: Chickens eat food scraps, all sorts of food scraps including egg shells! Get your neighbors to give you their food scraps in exchange for eggs. Buying grain is also necessary to supplement your food scraps. Bulk is much cheaper if you can find it nearby. Any feed store in your area will carry chicken feed. Make sure you store your feed in a place where mice can’t get to it. I store my feed in a big metal trash can with secure lid.

LOVE YOUR CHICKENS!

Watching chickens is great entertainment for the whole family!