Two weeks of summer. Four college credits. 14,000 acres of wilderness. What could be better than that?

  • Study the ecology of fish, mammals, birds, invertebrates, and plants
  • Practice sampling techniques including electrofishing, live-trapping and radio-tracking
  • Explore terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems
  • Learn to understand historical ecological patterns using paleoecology
  • Apply knowledge of water quality sampling and genetics
  • Take a researcher’s approach to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Introductory and Advanced courses run concurrently. The Introductory course is ideal for anyone age 16+ interested in obtaining a strong foundation of knowledge and skills through college-level coursework. Students in the Advanced course will earn upper-division (300-level) credits through a more rigorous approach to the curriculum. Students who complete either course will earn 4 college credits.

Course runs July 19 – August 1, 2020.
Program cost is $1,995 inclusive of all tuition, fees, room and board.
Some online preparatory work is required.

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Inquiry - ADK Field Ecology

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STORY MAPS

LUCY

The night before we went put to set traps. Our professor Dan talked to us about how the traps work and where we were going to place our traps. Both traps were set at the Sugarbush but one was placed … where trees had been selectively cut down for maple trees to flourish. …»

DANIEL

Out on the Red Dot Trail on the White Pine Road, the Field Ecology group and I had our Forest Ecology class with Justin Waskiewicz. He first had us take in our surroundings; such as, the song of the hermit thrush, detritus on the ground, the components of the understory (ferns, stumps, and logs), the canopy of the forest, and the sound of the leaves….»

ALYSSA

The last two weeks were a whirlwind of learning and new experiences. From climbing mountains to splashing around in streams, there was always something to be learned about that I wouldn’t have otherwise noticed. I was so pleasantly surprised by being humbled by how much there is to see and know….»